Banner Image

In May, the Computing Research Association (CRA) and its Computing Community Consortium (CCC) launched the CIFellows 2020 program, with strong support from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The program aims to provide a career-enhancing bridge experience for recent and soon-to-be computing PhD graduates to combat hiring disruptions due to COVID. This effort was modeled after the CRA/CCC’s NSF-funded Computing Innovation Fellows Programs with cohorts starting 2009, 2010, and 2011, which funded 127 fellows following the 2008 recession. 

After only a month following the program’s announcement, 550 applications were submitted spanning a wide variety of research areas and over 140 universities. More than 270 members of the community came out to support the effort by reviewing all applications under the tight deadline of two weeks. 

The 2020 CIFellows class is 59 researchers, 52% of whom are women, covering a wide variety of research areas. The program involved 59 different universities with Fellows coming from 46 unique institutions, and starting their fellowships at 43 different universities. You can find out more about each fellow here.

CRA and CCC are working with the computing community to ensure that this program facilitates career and skill growth for the Fellows in supportive environments to foster the talent of the future computing research community.

Committees​

Aruna Balasubramanian

Aruna Balasubramanian is an Assistant Professor at Stony Brook University. She was a CIFellow, part of the 2011 cohort, and did her Postdoctoral Research at the University of Washington. Aruna works in the areas of mobile systems and networking. She has recently been working on a diverse range of topics including improving Web access in developing regions, improving accessibility, and making mobile applications better with respect to user-facing metrics. Aruna is a recipient of a Mid-Career Faculty Diversity Award at Stony Brook University, the N2Women Rising Stars Award, a VMWare faculty early career award, a Google Research Award, a Best Paper Award at UbiComp, and the Applied Networking Research Prize. Her dissertation won the UMass Outstanding Dissertation Award and was the SIGCOMM Outstanding Dissertation Award runner up.


Andrew Bernat, ex officio

Andrew Bernat was a founding member and chair of the Computer Science Department at the University of Texas at El Paso (spending 20 years there), NSF Program Director and is currently the Executive Director of the Computing Research Association, whose mission is to strengthen research and education in the computing fields, expand opportunities for women and minorities, and improve public and policymaker understanding of the importance of computing and computing research in our society. In recognition of “… his success in creating arguably the strongest computer science department at a minority-serving institution …”, the Computing Research Association honored him with the 1997 A. Nico Habermann Award and he is a AAAS Fellow. He has some 65 publications and (pre-CRA) over $5,000,000 in external funding.


Elizabeth Bradley

Liz Bradley holds the SB, SM, and PhD degrees from MIT.  She has been with the Department of Computer Science at the University of Colorado since 1993 and is currently the Chair of the Computing Research Association’s Computing Community Consortium (CCC). Her research interests include nonlinear dynamics and nonlinear time-series analysis.  She is a member of the external faculty of the Santa Fe Institute and the recipient of a National Young Investigator award, Packard and Radcliffe Fellowships, and the University of Colorado system’s highest teaching award.


Ann Schwartz Drobnis, ex officio

Dr. Ann Schwartz Drobnis is the Director of the Computing Community Consortium. Most recently, she was an Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow at the National Science Foundation working on education and workforce development issues for the CISE Directorate. Ann spent most of her time working on the CS10K Project, whose goal is to get academically rigorous computer science courses into 10,000 high schools by 2016. This is a much needed effort to create the research and workforce pipeline that our field so desperately needs. Prior to her time at NSF, she taught high school computer science and math at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology. She has a passion for broadening participation in computing, as her doctoral research was focused on ways to bring more females into the field.


Mark D. Hill

Mark D. Hill is the John P. Morgridge Professor and Gene M. Amdahl Professor of Computer Sciences and Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where he also co-leads the Wisconsin Multifacet project. His research interests include parallel computer system design, memory system design, computer simulation, deterministic replay and transactional memory. He earned a PhD from University of California, Berkeley. He is the CCC Chair Emeritus, a CRA Board Member, an ACM Fellow, a Fellow of the IEEE, and won the 2019 Eckert-Mauchly Award.


Anita Jones

Anita Jones is University Professor Emerita at the University of Virginia.  She is a founder of the Computing Community Consortium (CCC).  After the completion of the first Computing Innovation Fellows program, she led a CCC research effort to establish best practices for the support of computer science postdocs.  Jones served as Director of Defense Research and Engineering, overseeing the DoD science and technology program, including its research laboratories and DARPA.  She was Vice Chair of the National Science Board and a member of the governing council of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE).  Jones was awarded the IEEE Founders’ Medal, the Ada Lovelace Award by the Association of Women in Computing, the Arthur M. Bueche Award by the NAE, and the Philip Abelson Award by the AAAS.  The U.S. Navy named a seamount in the North Pacific (51º 25’ N  159º 10’ W) for her.


Stefan Savage

Stefan Savage is a professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of California, San Diego. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science and Engineering from the University of Washington and a B.S. in Applied History from Carnegie Mellon University. Savage is a full-time empiricist, whose research interests lie at the intersection of computer security, distributed systems and networking. He currently serves as co-director of UCSD’s Center for Network Systems (CNS) and for the Center for Evidence based Security Research (CESR). Savage is a MacArthur Fellow, a Sloan Fellow, an ACM Fellow, and is a recipient of the ACM Prize in Computing and the ACM SIGOPS Weiser Award.


Ellen Zegura

Ellen Zegura is Regents’ Professor and Fleming Endowed Chair holder in the School of Computer Science at Georgia Tech. She works in two primary areas, computer networking and computing for social good. In computer networking, she is known for her work on the GT-ITM suite of Internet topology tools, which remain in use 20 years after release. In mobile wireless networking, she and colleagues invented the concept of message ferries to facilitate communications in environments where network connectivity is unreliable and/or sparse. Her work in computing and social good includes work in Liberia, with Native Americans in Southern California, and with residents of the Westside of Atlanta. She is a Fellow of the IEEE, a Fellow of the ACM, and an elected member of the Computing Research Association Board (CRA). Since Fall 2014 she has been on the Executive Board of the CRA.

 

Aruna Balasubramanian

Aruna Balasubramanian is an Assistant Professor at Stony Brook University. She was a CI Fellow, part of the 2011 cohort, and did her Postdoctoral Research at the University of Washington. Aruna works in the areas of mobile systems and networking. She has recently been working on a diverse range of topics including improving Web access in developing regions, improving accessibility, and making mobile applications better with respect to user-facing metrics. Aruna is a recipient of a Mid-Career Faculty Diversity Award at Stony Brook University, the N2Women Rising Stars Award, a VMWare faculty early career award, a Google Research Award, a Best Paper Award at UbiComp, and the Applied Networking Research Prize. Her dissertation won the UMass Outstanding Dissertation Award and was the SIGCOMM Outstanding Dissertation Award runner up. 


Ifeoma Nwogu

Ifeoma Nwogu is an Assistant Professor in Computer Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology, since January 2017. Before that she was a Research Scientist at the Center for Unified Biometrics and Sensors (CUBS) and the Center of Excellence for Document Analysis and Recognition (CEDAR), from October 2011 till September 2016. 

Ifeoma completed her PhD in 2009 at the Computer Science and Engineering department at the University at Buffalo, SUNY (UB)  as an NSF IGERT Fellow and was an NSF-sponsored Computing Innovation Postdoctoral Fellow at the Computer Science department at the University of Rochester, working with Dr. Chris Brown in Computer Vision. Before that, she completed her master’s degree in Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania and her Electrical Engineering undergraduate degree at the University of Lagos, Nigeria.


Brian Scassellati

Brian Scassellati is the A. Bartlett Giamatti Professor of Computer Science, Cognitive Science, and Mechanical Engineering at Yale University.  His research focuses on understanding how humans and robots interact with each other, using methods from artificial intelligence to build smarter and more interactive machines as well as methods from psychology to understand how robots reveal our uniquely human social capabilities.  He and his students have worked to build socially assistive robots that help children with autism spectrum disorder learn social skills, collaborative manufacturing robots that work side-by-side with people to help with everyday tasks, and humanoid robots that help us understand why we treat some robots as objects and other robots like people.

Scassellati received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2001. He currently serves on the Executive Council of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI).  He has been the chair or program chair for the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, the ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, and the IEEE International Conference on Development and Learning.


Bobby Schnabel
Bobby Schnabel is Professor of Computer Science, external chair of the department (including strategic planning, tech community and alumni relations, and faculty mentoring), College of Engineering and Applied Science Faculty Director for Entrepreneurship, and Campus Thought-Leader on Computing.  Previously he was CEO of ACM (Association for Computing Machinery) from 2015-17, Dean of the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University from 2007-2015, and on the Computer Science faculty at University of Colorado Boulder from 1977-2007.   At CU Boulder he also was CS department chair from 1990-95, CEAS associate dean for academic affairs from 1995-97, founding director of the ATLAS Institute from 1997-2007, and vice provost for academic and campus computing and campus Chief Information Officer from 1998-2007.  He is a co-founder of the National Center for Women & Information Technology and continues to serve on the NCWIT executive team.  

 

Andrew Bernat

Andrew Bernat was a founding member and chair of the Computer Science Department at the University of Texas at El Paso (spending 20 years there), NSF Program Director and is currently the Executive Director of the Computing Research Association, whose mission is to strengthen research and education in the computing fields, expand opportunities for women and minorities, and improve public and policymaker understanding of the importance of computing and computing research in our society. In recognition of “… his success in creating arguably the strongest computer science department at a minority-serving institution …”, the Computing Research Association honored him with the 1997 A. Nico Habermann Award and he is a AAAS Fellow. He has some 65 publications and (pre-CRA) over $5,000,000 in external funding.


Elizabeth Bradley

Liz Bradley holds the SB, SM, and PhD degrees from MIT.  She has been with the Department of Computer Science at the University of Colorado since 1993 and is currently the Chair of the Computing Research Association’s Computing Community Consortium (CCC). Her research interests include nonlinear dynamics and nonlinear time-series analysis.  She is a member of the external faculty of the Santa Fe Institute and the recipient of a National Young Investigator award, Packard and Radcliffe Fellowships, and the University of Colorado system’s highest teaching award.


Ann Schwartz Drobnis

Dr. Ann Schwartz Drobnis is the Director of the Computing Community Consortium. Most recently, she was an Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow at the National Science Foundation working on education and workforce development issues for the CISE Directorate. Ann spent most of her time working on the CS10K Project, whose goal is to get academically rigorous computer science courses into 10,000 high schools by 2016. This is a much needed effort to create the research and workforce pipeline that our field so desperately needs. Prior to her time at NSF, she taught high school computer science and math at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology. She has a passion for broadening participation in computing, as her doctoral research was focused on ways to bring more females into the field.


Mark D. Hill

Mark D. Hill is the John P. Morgridge Professor and Gene M. Amdahl Professor of Computer Sciences and Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where he also co-leads the Wisconsin Multifacet project. His research interests include parallel computer system design, memory system design, computer simulation, deterministic replay and transactional memory. He earned a PhD from University of California, Berkeley. He is the CCC Chair Emeritus, a CRA Board Member, an ACM Fellow, a Fellow of the IEEE, and won the 2019 Eckert-Mauchly Award.


Ellen Zegura

Ellen Zegura is Regents’ Professor and Fleming Endowed Chair holder in the School of Computer Science at Georgia Tech. She works in two primary areas, computer networking and computing for social good. In computer networking, she is known for her work on the GT-ITM suite of Internet topology tools, which remain in use 20 years after release. In mobile wireless networking, she and colleagues invented the concept of message ferries to facilitate communications in environments where network connectivity is unreliable and/or sparse. Her work in computing and social good includes work in Liberia, with Native Americans in Southern California, and with residents of the Westside of Atlanta. She is a Fellow of the IEEE, a Fellow of the ACM, and an elected member of the Computing Research Association Board (CRA). Since Fall 2014 she has been on the Executive Board of the CRA.

Contact Us